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Reflections

Consisting of relflections in a variety of categories, including:
<ul>
<li>scripture (homiletic reflections)
<li>philosophy (metaphysics or epistemology)
<li>morality
<li>psychology
<li>spiritual development
<li>science or mathematics
<li>technology
<li>medicine
<li>Church documents
<li>catechesis
</ul>

The Age of Moral Confusion (Part II): moral drift

I have offered simple orbital mechanics, and the earth/sun "system", as a metaphor for the importance of the connection between the unitive and procreative aspects of the marital act. I would like to suggest another metaphor to help us understand and appreciate the notion of "moral drift" in the absence of divine replenishment. In analogy with the thermodynamic law of entropy (the second law of thermodynamics), I would like to suggest that there is a kind of moral and spiritual equivalent.

The Age of Moral Confusion: How did we get here?

A century ago it could be said that there was a reasonable consensus regarding basic moral questions among Americans and Europeans. Today, that consensus no longer exists, except in isolated pockets or communities. Why the difference?

The progressive's "anagogical sense" of Constitutional interpretation

Scripture is written by people. Inspired scripture is written by people under God's inspiration. Inspired scripture is inherently deeper than that which is not. The Church has recognized this point, and discerned three spiritual senses of interpretation (allegorical, moral and anagogical) of the canon of scripture to supplement the literal interpretation. To tease out the literal interpretation, it can be necessary to apply technical means such as historical and literary criticism. What did the original human author intend to convey?

Changing the heart [Reflecting on Matthew 5:17-37]

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This Sunday we have a lengthy reading from Jesus' Sermon on the Mount, as reported in the Gospel of St. Matthew. At the beginning of the reading, Jesus informs us that "I have come not to abolish but to fulfill." Among his teachings, we find the following commandments that serve to fulfill the meaning and purpose of the Law of Moses.

Repairing the incoherence of the term "Catholic"

While the author of "Our Secular Future", a piece in America Magazine, has some important things to say about the cultural clash between (what I prefer to call) serious Christians and the increasingly dominant secular progressive elites, the comments that follow the article point to dissent even to his employment of the term "Catholic". Given all the controversy over the meaning of the word "Catholic" and who is allowed, or not allowed, to apply that term to themselves, I propose the following solution:

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